Things About Space you Probably Don’t Know

You see, living in space comes with a few risks and the more you understand the solar system, the easier it is to see why this is the case. There’s every chance that you’ve already heard a lot about the universe but these facts are downright astonishing.

There’s No Connection Between Planetary Nebulae and Planets

When you take a closer look at telescope images it’s not hard to see a resemblance of heavenly bodies to the Earth. In fact, some of these objects look like faint, downy greenish disks with a semblance to the planet Uranus. William Herschel, an 18th-century astronomer named them “planetary nebula,” a Latin word for dim objects seen in early telescopes.

But, it will shock you to know that despite their appearance, planetary nebulae are merely expanding clouds of gas and debris. They are, however, larger than any planet or star.

The Earth Isn’t Round

The Earth is not round. It is neither flat nor rectangular for that matter. Most images show the Earth as being somewhat spherical, but that’s not the only impression. Even if you were to consider these images, there’s satellite data that indicates possible depressions close to the South Pole and some bulge near the North Pole.

There are records to show that the Earth is to some extent squashed. Think of it in terms of two big hands pressing it on both poles. While the effect is hardly noticeable, it makes the Earth more or less an oblate spheroid.

There’s Lots of Water and Oxygen in Space

You need water to live. While the Earth is the only place in the entire universe with large water bodies, water happens to be the most common compound in the Universe. There have been traces of water molecules in clouds found in deep space. A recent discovery indicates there’s about 140 trillion times more water in one tiny corner of the universe than the one in all oceans of the Earth.

The Bottom Line

There’s so much to learn about the space that scientists believe they’ve barely scratched the surface. Did you know, for instance, that Jupiter may have up to 35,000-degree ice? Yes, there more to the largest planet in the universe than the deep clouds above its surface. It turns out there’s so much atmospheric pressure in Jupiter that solid crystalline ice can exist even at 40,000 degrees Fahrenheit.